BNSF, KC Southern Combine on New Intermodal Service from Chicago to Mexico

BNSF and KCS will offer a new intermodal service connecting major industrial and consumer markets in Mexico with key U.S. cities.

BNSF
BNSF and KCS will offer a new intermodal service connecting major industrial and consumer markets in Mexico with key U.S. cities for a new option for shipping freight to Mexico or shipping freight from Mexico.
BNSF and KCS will offer a new intermodal service connecting major industrial and consumer markets in Mexico with key U.S. cities for a new option for shipping freight to Mexico or shipping freight from Mexico.

BNSF Railway and Kansas City Southern have announced they are joining forces to offer new rail and intermodal service from Chicago to Dallas and Mexico starting on December 1, providing cross-border intermodal service five days a week. The route will offer shippers an alternative to cross-border trucking from Toluca, San Luis Potosí or Monterrey, Mexico, into the United States.

Customers also can connect to and from Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Stockton, California, and Seattle and Portland, Oregon, the companies announced.

“We are excited to be partnering with KCS to offer our customers a new, efficient and reliable way to access some of Mexico’s largest metropolitan markets,” said Katie Farmer, group vice president of BNSF Consumer Products. “These new services leverage our strong intermodal product and KCS’ expertise south of the border to enhance customers’ supply chain efficiency into and out of Mexico.”

“The Kansas City Southern Railway Co. in the U.S. and Kansas City Southern de México are proud to partner with BNSF... to compete more effectively in the market and provide enhanced supply chain logistics to the customer,” said Erik Hansen, KCS vice president of intermodal.

Both companies touted that the service would provide “truck-like” intermodal transit times, when compared with motor carriers, and also emphasized that unlike truck shipments, intermodal rail shipments won’t have to stop at the border for customs clearance. Instead, shipments travel in-bond, clearing customs at Mexico origins and destinations.

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