Supply Scan

Potentially Hazardous Containers Close Two Terminals at the Port of Oakland Workers from the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) forced the shutdown of two marine terminals at the Port of Oakland in late October over concerns that...


Paper will most likely go the same way as an experiment 10 years ago, when CHEP made thousands of plastic pallets for its pool before dropping the plan, he continued, not least because they proved more prone to “disappear” than wooden ones, being harder-wearing and therefore more useful for a multitude of secondary purposes.

The deciding factor in Ikea’s foray into paper will be whether the savings on transportation costs from the lighter loads, higher volumes and one-way travel outweigh those from deploying wooden pallets on multiple trips, says Jeff McBee, a pallet analyst at Industrial Reporting Inc. in Ashland, Virginia.

“This obviously looks good to Ikea on paper, but I’d like to see what they have to say a year from now,” he says. “I’m not necessarily skeptical, but it may be closer to a wash than they suspect.”

 

GMA Plays Role in Creating World’s First Global Food Safety Fund

Pamela G. Bailey, president and CEO of the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), joined the U.S. government and World Bank officials in announcing an innovative public private partnership that has pledged $1 million for the creation of the world’s first Global Food Safety Fund for capacity building.

To be managed by the World Bank, the proposed fund will leverage the tripartite approach pioneered in APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) that enlists a wide range of stakeholders in training programs designed to enhance food safety and to facilitate trade.

“GMA was honored to be a founding member of a unique partnership in APEC that inspired the concept of the fund’s creation. In APEC, we brought together food safety regulators, multi-lateral institutions like the World Bank, academia and industry—stakeholders all focused on a common mission of improving food safety,” stated Bailey. “Building on the landmark MOU between the APEC Food Safety Cooperation Forum and the World Bank signed in May 2011, the proposed fund will leverage APEC’s unique food safety training programs together with World Bank international reach to help improve the safety of the global food supply—in APEC economies and beyond.”

Public and private sector stakeholders have pledged $1 million to create the trust fund. In the next decade, the fund is expected to grow to $15 to $20 million.

“Food and beverage companies have a vast amount of experience, knowledge and understanding when it comes to developing and manufacturing safe products. We know what works, what doesn’t work and how to apply best practices along the entire global supply chain to ensure our products are safe. This fund will allow us to share our skills and technical expertise in food safety on a much broader scale,” noted Bailey.

 

U.S. Congress Proposes Voluntary Air Cargo Screening

The U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Transportation Security has proposed a new Transportation Security Administration (TSA) bill, which includes a voluntary air cargo screening program.

The proposed air cargo advanced screening (ACAS) program encourages cargo carriers to provide shipment level data for air cargo bound for the U.S., enabling the TSA to target and inspect high-risk cargo at the point of departure.

Per ACAS, the advance information must be submitted electronically no later than loading of the cargo onto aircraft at the last point of departure before entering the U.S.

“Screening all cargo before flight to the United States would slow the international supply chain to a crawl. Given the tones of air cargo shipped every day, a risk-based approach is the only feasible solution to finding threats in the supply chain,” states an American Airlines Cargo blog.

The TSA bill also establishes a certification process for third-party explosives detection dogs to be used in air cargo screening.

Congress is taking a collaborative approach to ACAS, with plans to consult with the industry to ensure the program is “operationally feasible and practical.”

If adopted, the program will take a noticeably different direction than the TSA’s original 100 percent screening mandate, which was scheduled to take effect at the end of the year (2011), but is expected to be postponed.

HR 3011, entitled the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, was introduced by Congressman Mike Rogers of Alabama, and is currently in committee review.

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