Planning For A Rainy Day

Event management solutions help identify situations that require or warrant human intervention—as they are developing.


Both Logility and Infor employ "dashboard" interfaces to help users organize and customize the way they interact with the event management function.

Upon log-in, users of Infor's system are immediately taken to "the exception desk," which shows, based on their specific authorizations, all new exceptions that fall under their concern, plus current exceptions still outstanding, and events that have been closed in the recent past.

"This is where users spend much of their time," Vyas says.

In addition, associates can access the event database, to create custom reports on past situations.

"They can use these reports to see what sorts of exceptions have happened in the recent past, to look for trends or recurring problems," he notes.

"Once customers notice a trend in a particular area, they'll often define additional monitors around it to help identify the root cause," Nilsson adds.

Logility's "control tower" is similarly designed to give users an overview of all situations requiring their attention in one quick glance. The dashboard shows all the key performance indicators an individual might track, with red, yellow and green lights to highlight and prioritize the most critical alerts.

"Users can also opt to receive alerts via phone or email if they prefer, instead of by logging onto a web browser," Bursa notes.

Although the "behind the scenes" data screening processes that drive event management systems can be quite complex, the ways users interface with these systems are fairly simple and intuitive. The software does the heavy lifting.

"A typical implementation of our event management system from scratch takes 30 days. Some companies are up in as little as two weeks," says Nilsson of Infor.

"It's a high ROI product," he adds, "because not only can it be implemented quickly, but it also provides actionable data very quickly."

Bursa notes that many of Logility's customers start by applying the system to short-term events like missed delivery windows.

"Then they back up and get more strategic, looking at forecast capabilities, for example. They start to set thresholds for what they expect to do in the market with specific products over the next six months, for example, and then when the orders start to come in, they can see if they're ahead of projections or behind," she says.

"And if the orders aren't coming in the quantities expected, they can consider quickly putting a promotion in place to move additional product, perhaps. The ability to react quickly to situations as they develop lets companies become much more aggressive about demand shaping."

 

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