Jelly Belly's Sweet Decision

The candy manufacturer implements enterprise-wide applications to streamline its supply chain.


Jelly Belly's new manufacturing plant in Thailand will also be tied into the system. "Given the 14 hour time difference between Thailand and our headquarters, this wouldn't be possible without the solution," says Schader.

Jelly Belly attributes the success of its Lawson implementation to several factors, such as strong executive sponsorship of the project and a collaborative partnership between the two companies. The candy maker is in the process of implementing two additional Lawson applications--a plant maintenance module and sales and marketing system.

"Commodity prices are going through the roof and fuel is sky high, which costs us on all of our raw material inputs and finished goods costs for shipping," says Schader. " It's very difficult to pass those costs on to our national retail accounts. Faced with that squeeze, you really have to have tools to make better decisions. M3 is allowing us to do that."

Jelly Belly's Application Mix

The Jelly Belly Candy Co. is relying on enterprise-wide applications to reduce operating costs and improve customer service. Here's a rundown of the Lawson M3 7.1 Application suite which it recently implemented:

• The financial management application handles all financial accounting, budgeting, reporting and transaction processing. It helps save costs, eliminate redundancies, streamline activities and allow redeployment of assets to more profitable activities.
• The supply chain management suite manages planning, scheduling and fulfillment for optimum service levels and maximum profitability.
• Business Performance Warehouse is an easy-to-use data warehouse solution built on leading-edge data warehouse technology. As a data warehouse solution, BPW extracts and consolidates data generated by dispersed systems. This assists Jelly Belly by making the information available to decision makers throughout the organization in a flexible and powerful format.
• The demand planner application helps improve forecast accuracy, which in turn reduces rush orders and stock handling costs. The solution also helps Jelly Belly avoid excessive inventory, which can lead to increased operating costs.
• Supply chain orders enables Jelly belly to link various orders within a supply chain, provider greater visibility across its entire supply chain and greater flexibility to react to order changes.

In addition, the Smart Client user interface simplifies how Jelly Belly interacts with the system by enabling user-specific customization and personalization so users see just the tools and information they need. Smart Client also allows Jelly Belly to embed content into links within the Web-based Lawson applications. This enables employees to move between data in one click vs. three or four, without having to open several windows at the same time.

History Of Innovation Continues

President Ronald Reagan made Jelly Belly a household name during his tenure in the White House. Reagan's favorite candy, he made Jelly Belly jelly beans a staple in the Oval Office and on Air Force One. In 1983, he sent the beans on the space shuttle Challenger as a surprise for the astronauts--the first jelly beans to go into orbit.

The Jelly Belly brand was introduced in 1976 by what was then known as the Herman Goelitz Candy Co. The company developed jelly beans with a "true-to-life" taste using natural ingredients for flavoring and color. The first eight flavors rolled out were very cherry, lemon, cream soda, tangerine, green apple, root beer, grape and licorice.

Today, the brand features more than 50 official Jelly Belly flavors plus over 50 "unofficial" flavors, including a new Cold Stone Ice Cream Parlor mix of six flavors. A 49-flavor mix is its most popular product and very cherry is the number one flavor, followed by buttered popcorn. More than 12 billion Jelly Belly beans are consumed worldwide each year.

Jelly Belly also produces more than 100 other types of candies, chocolates, gummies, sour candies and confections for all of the major seasons.

"The Goelitz family started making candy corn in 1898 and we're still making it," says Ryan Schader, the company's vice president of business development. "Today, we have a broad line of more than 1,400 SKUs. This is a family-owned, fifth-generation confectionery company and we need to continually come up with new products to stay competitive. For example, we've recently branched out into nutraceutical products with our Sports Beans line. Innovation is our life blood."

Already have an account? Click here to Log in.

Enhance Your Experience.

When you register for FoodLogistics.com you stay connected to the pulse of the industry by signing up for topic-based e-newsletters and information. Registering also allows you to quickly comment on content and request more infomation.

OR

Complete the registration form.

Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required