Supply Scan

News and trends from across the food supply chain.


In partnership with GS1 US (formerly the Uniform Code Council), GMA examined the available options that would enable companies to comply with the Bioterrorism Act's record-keeping rules. GMA and GS1 US found that EDI meets these requirements, and will have little or no effect on total supply chain costs.

"The food and beverage industry is fully committed to ensuring the security of the food supply. And, having closely reviewed the Bioterrorism Act with GS1 US, we are confident that EDI will meet the requirements for record-keeping between manufacturers and retailers effectively and efficiently," says Pam Stegeman, GMA's vice president of supply chain and technology.

The Bioterrorism Act requires all companies that manufacture, process, pack, transport, receive, hold or import food to establish and maintain records of transactions for all food products. All effected firms must be able to track products one step up and one step back through the supply chain, and may use existing paper or electronic systems to do so. They will have to be able to provide records within 24 hours of a resquest by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which is enforcing the rules.

GS1 US is an industry-supported, not-for-profit organization dedicated to the adoption and implementation of standards-based, global supply chain solutions. GS1 US-based solutions, including EDI transaction sets and barcode identification standards, are currently used by more than 1 million member companies worldwide.

Sara Lee, Dannon Make The Switch To CHEP Pallets
Sara Lee Food & Beverage will soon be moving all products on those trusty blue pallets from CHEP, based in Orlando, FL. By the beginning of next year, most of Sara Lee's biggest brands, including Ball Park, Jimmy Dean and Hillshire Farm, will be shipped to grocery, foodservice, club store and convenience store retailers from the company's 22 processing and distribution locations around the country on CHEP pallets.

The Downers Grove, IL-based division of the Sara Lee Corp. previously used one-way wood pallets to ship products to its customers, but experienced pallet supply challenges and other operating inefficiencies. In addition, the one-way nature of the system added to the country's waste stream and has other negative environmental factors.

"The economics of the CHEP solution provides us with clear financial benefits gained from sturdier unit loads and improved product handling. CHEP is also helping us positively impact the environment by reducing the number of pallets sent to landfills," says Larry Rogers, senior vice president of supply chain at Sara Lee. "Sara Lee F&B will also lower its overall shipping platform and carrier costs by moving to CHEP."

The Dannon Co. Inc., White Plains, NY, also joined the CHEP pallet pool. Several of Dannon's brands are now being shipped to the grocery, mass merchandiser, club, convenience and foodservice trade channels on CHEP pallets.

Dannon previously shipped its product using a pallet exchange system, however, the company determined that the CHEP program is more efficient and provides transportation synergies and environmental benefits including the reduction of packaging entering the waste stream.

"Dannon is focused on fulfilling the needs of our customers, and the CHEP program clearly helps us become more efficient, particularly on the receiving docks. The program also helps us secure optimal pricing from our carriers, which improves asset utilization, and is better for the environment," says Jim Felmley, logistics director at Dannon. D

Rite-Hite IDs Greatest Dock Safety Threats
In an effort to address two main loading dock safety issues, Rite-Hite Corp., Milwaukee, launched an awareness campaign and last month released a series of products specifically designed to minimize problems related to what it calls "dock shock" and "trailer drop."

Dock shock, as defined by Rite-Hite's vice president of marketing, Joe Mannone, occurs when a forklift crosses the bridge between the loading dock and the trailer. Trailer drop, he says, refers to the bouncing of a trailer as a forklift moves in and out of it. Both are among the leading causes of product and equipment damage and forklift operator health issues, including musculoskeletal disorders of the neck, back, hands and arms, as well as fatigue.

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