Stop, Thief!

What companies might not know about protecting their goods from cargo theft.


"The seal is a great device to help identify loads that have been tampered with," says Tom Hayes, vice president, global sales and marketing for Tyden Brammal, an Angola, IN-based manufacturer of transportation security seals. "We have a process that they use to record the seal number and if the shipper is using their seals correctly, they will have a closed loop system to signify what loads have potentially been tampered with. If those numbers don't match, or if the seal is missing, the load should be rejected."

"The main thing you know is that when that truck has been sealed and leaves the facility, the integrity of that shipment is assured and as long as the sealed number is accurate on the shipping documentation, it's a very inexpensive way to identify potential theft."

Maintaining the seal integrity by making sure that the driver isn't the one to record the seal number on all shipping documentation, nor is he the one who verifies and detaches the seal when he arrives at a facility, is a practical way to make sure there has been no off-loading of cargo containers somewhere along the supply chain route.

 

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