A Pallet For Every Taste

Alternatives to wood help make food and warehouses safer.


Stories about meat and produce contaminated by wisteria, E coli and other deadly bacteria are hitting the news on an almost daily basis, highlighting the growing concern over food safety in the United States.

In addition, fires at food manufacturing facilities are raising questions about safety at these plants and how a company's choice of material handling equipment can make a difference. These and other issues are forcing food manufacturers and distributors to pay more attention to alternatives to white wooden pallets.

Today there are dozens of companies in the marketplace that are offering alternatives that range from plastic pallets to aluminum pallets to steel pallets. Each of these pallet choices presents solutions that may make them worth considering.

The manufacturers of plastic pallets stress their products' durability. Some cite large numbers of turns for their pallets that run in the 150 to 250 range. Wooden pallets, they say, average seven to 10 trips.

"A wood pallet will take four or five hits with a pallet jack and then you have to replace a deck board," says Curt Most, national sales manager for pallets for Orbis Corp., Oconomowoc, WI. "There are only so many places you can put a nail in the stringer."

Because of the composition of plastic pallets, manufacturers and distributors are relieved of the dangers of dealing with wood shards or nails in their sensitive environments.

"If you're running conveyors, with plastic pallets you're not going to have pieces of the pallet that can get caught in the conveyors or cause problems with any of the automated equipment," notes J.D. Coult, national sales manager, material handling group, for Rehrig Pacific, Los Angeles.

Bob Noland, senior vice president of sales and marketing for plastic pallet maker Greystone Logistics, Tulsa, OK, says in addition, companies don't want foreign objects such as nails or wood chips that can fall off of damaged wooden pallets ending up in their products.

"I've been to the facilities of a major cereal manufacturer which used to have full time people on each shift to air blow the wood chips out of all of the lines. It had so many wood splinters that came off the line due to the chain conveyors eating away at the wood pallets, that it had to clean it continuously day in and day out," he says.

"It had a pile of refuse behind its facility that made it look like it was a mulching company."

The manufacturer later switched to plastic pallets. "A pallet can create a lot of damage in the supply chain if it's not designed properly or doesn't do what it's needed to do."

Part of that damage can result from the fact that there are variances in the dimensions of wooden pallets, which can cause them to become stuck in retrieval lanes.

"I have a customer who has an ASRS system and he was using wood," explains Orbis' Most. "The wood pallets just weren't all that identical. He was sending people into a freezer 30 times a day to repair the wood pallets, but now that he's got plastic, he doesn't have to send them in as much."

Plastic pallets, he says, because they are created from a molding process, maintain a consistent uniformity that allows them to interface with machinery in a much smoother fashion. "It's the reliability of the dimensions. If you can put a pallet through your system the first time, all the pallets that follow it are going to run through your system all the time, every time, because the dimensions are the same."

Many pallets contain different resin blends that allow for added durability, while others can have metal or fiberglass rods inserted into them when they are formed, to provide stabilization for heavier loads.

Other types of pallets are constructed with structural foam, which is made of plastic resin that is mixed with gases during the molding process to form small air cells within the plastic, creating stronger and lighter weight walls and bases underneath a solid surface.

Containing Contamination

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