Supply Scan

News & Trends from Across the Food Supply Chain


Direct store delivery (DSD) suppliers generally agree that using SKU movement data as a component of order generation is beneficial as a shelf order guide for warehouse delivered product. However, suppliers feel that there remains a system gap with the suggest order information from retailer CAO to DSD vendors, requiring suppliers to adjust the order and reformat it for the supplier system. This creates a less than win/win scenario with increased cost-to-serve.

When survey participants were asked about the most frustrating aspects of the retailer/supplier relationship, they identified a lack of the “ability” to collaborate as the biggest issue. Trust remains a significant issue as well.

Horst said the survey calls for trading partners to find new ways to work together:

• Recognize that the tools are there—Across the board, someone, somewhere in our industry has implemented the individual process, systems, material handling equipment or human resource related building blocks supporting collaboration. Create a landscape map of this universe of capabilities and begin teaching ourselves what it can mean within our own organization and for key partnerships.
• Continue to break down silos—Achieving the benefit associated with molding the building blocks into a winning strategy will require increasingly cross-functional and cross-organizational shared metrics and consequences. When we achieve them, all parties should benefit.
• Understand each others requirements—Now that most of us can share descriptive data of use by our trading partners, it is time to figure out exactly what to share, how to share it and what benefit comes from the exercise. Much as we tackled the thorny issue of backhaul and perfect order, we should focus an empowered committee on defining the landscape of tactical information exchange.

The study is available online at www.gmaonline.org/publications and www.fmi.org.

» Crown Unveils Its First
Internal Combustion Forklift

Crown Equipment Corp. has introduced its first company-manufactured internal combustion (IC) forklift: the Crown C-5 Series.

The New Bremen, OH-based company says the forklift, which is designed to push the limits of IC performance, leverages the company’s core expertise and heritage in material handling to deliver commanding advantages to owners and operators seeking improved power and strength, service and uptime, and comfort and safety.

The Crown C-5 features an industrial engine that was jointly developed with John Deere Power Systems (John Deere), a proactive approach to engine cooling and radiator clearing via an on-demand cooling system, and design innovations that improve operator visibility, comfort and productivity.

Crown says product owners will see immediate return on their investment from extended service intervals and an exclusive Crown power brake system that collectively reduce maintenance costs and downtime.

“Our customers came to us with internal combustion forklift issues related to engine performance, overheating, operator comfort and maintenance,” says Jim Dicke III, Crown’s president. “Our fresh perspective on these problems, combined with extensive research and development, and our 50-year legacy of innovation and material handling expertise, allowed us to create a truly industrial forklift. We saw an opportunity to help our customers move beyond the existing limitations of IC truck performance.”

Crown says an integral element to its research and development efforts was the analysis of maintenance work performed on thousands of IC trucks. This process enabled the company to determine the most common and costly problems, and focus its design to solve the most universal uptime and service challenges traditionally accepted within the IC market.

According to Crown research, sub-par performance was one of two predominant downfalls of existing IC forklifts that rely on automotive-style engines. A co-development project with John Deere produced a 2.4-liter industrial engine for the Crown C-5 that the companies say integrates the best practices from the diesel engines used to power John Deere’s rugged construction equipment with the best practices from Crown’s five decades in material handling.

Already have an account? Click here to Log in.

Enhance Your Experience.

When you register for FoodLogistics.com you stay connected to the pulse of the industry by signing up for topic-based e-newsletters and information. Registering also allows you to quickly comment on content and request more infomation.

OR

Complete the registration form.

Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required